Union’s Commitment to a Harassment-free Workplace


Union’s Commitment to a Harassment-free Workplace

The Union’s Declaration of Principles includes the following beliefs: equality among men and women striving to promote universal solidarity everywhere; recognition of the dignity of people; and a fair and just return for a worker’s labour regardless of their personal characteristics.

The Union is committed to fostering a harassment-free workplace where all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. Harassment will not be tolerated.

Harassment

Harassment may occur in the form of a single serious incident or several incidents over a period of time.

Discrimination is harassment that results in unfair or negative treatment of a person or group based on a protected characteristic. Human rights law protects individuals from harassment based on the following grounds: race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex (gender, gender identity and pregnancy), sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability (physical or mental) or conviction of an offence for which a pardon has been granted or in respect of which a record suspension has been ordered.

Harassment refers to inappropriate conduct or comments that:

  • relate to one of the human rights grounds listed above;
  • are unwelcome to the recipient;
  • disrespect, demean, humiliate, embarrass, offend or discriminate against the individual targeted; and
  • would reasonably be expected to negatively affect the work environment or lead to adverse job-related consequences.

Consequences of Harassing Behaviour

The consequences for committing harassing behaviour can be serious. If an Employee or Representative of the Union is found to have harassed another individual, that Employee or Representative may be subject to disciplinary action up to termination.

In addition to constituting grounds for discipline, the WorkSafeBC Act and policies require workers to take reasonable care to protect the health and safety of co-workers, which includes not engaging in bullying and harassment. WorkSafeBC policy defines bullying and harassment as “any inappropriate conduct or comment by a person towards a worker that the person knew or reasonably ought to have known would cause that worker to be humiliated or intimidated”.  Examples include verbal aggression or insults, calling someone derogatory names, and harmful hazing or initiation practices.

For more information, please see the International Longshore & Warehouse Union Local 500 Anti-Harassment Policy and Procedures at www.ilwu500.org

Union’s Commitment to a Harassment-free Workplace

The Union’s Declaration of Principles includes the following beliefs: equality among men and women striving to promote universal solidarity everywhere; recognition of the dignity of people; and a fair and just return for a worker’s labour regardless of their personal characteristics.

The Union is committed to fostering a harassment-free workplace where all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. Harassment will not be tolerated.

Harassment

Harassment may occur in the form of a single serious incident or several incidents over a period of time.

Discrimination is harassment that results in unfair or negative treatment of a person or group based on a protected characteristic. Human rights law protects individuals from harassment based on the following grounds: race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, age, sex (gender, gender identity and pregnancy), sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability (physical or mental) or conviction of an offence for which a pardon has been granted or in respect of which a record suspension has been ordered.

Harassment refers to inappropriate conduct or comments that:

  • relate to one of the human rights grounds listed above;
  • are unwelcome to the recipient;
  • disrespect, demean, humiliate, embarrass, offend or discriminate against the individual targeted; and
  • would reasonably be expected to negatively affect the work environment or lead to adverse job-related consequences.

Consequences of Harassing Behaviour 

The consequences for committing harassing behaviour can be serious. If an Employee or Representative of the Union is found to have harassed another individual, that Employee or Representative may be subject to disciplinary action up to termination.

In addition to constituting grounds for discipline, the WorkSafeBC Act and policies require workers to take reasonable care to protect the health and safety of co-workers, which includes not engaging in bullying and harassment. WorkSafeBC policy defines bullying and harassment as “any inappropriate conduct or comment by a person towards a worker that the person knew or reasonably ought to have known would cause that worker to be humiliated or intimidated”.  Examples include verbal aggression or insults, calling someone derogatory names, and harmful hazing or initiation practices.

For more information, please see the International Longshore & Warehouse Union Local 500 Anti-Harassment Policy and Procedures at www.ilwu500.org

Click here  Harassment Free Workplace 2017

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